Flotilla 2020 – A Strategic Acquistion

The Finnish corvette program is steadily moving forward, and it is nice to see that the Navy is also becoming more open regarding the project. A while back the Navy published a 20-page long document which in quite some detail went through the background of the project, and how it ended up with four multipurpose corvettes being the vessels of choice for Flotilla 2020. This was followed up by a four page article by captain (N) Valkamo, the Navy’s Assistant Chief of Staff / Plans, published in the personnel magazine Rannikon puolustaja (fi. Defender of the Coast). The latter provide a good overlook over the project, including the background research and some further nuggets of information compared to the longer text.

While the program seems to enjoy broad support amongst the Navy (unsurprising) and politicians, it continues to be something of a hot topic amongst parts of the general population and other service branches. With this in mind, it comes as no surprise that both texts place a heavy focus on the solid groundwork made before the decision to focus on four multipurpose corvettes was made.

First, the nature of the future naval battlefield was predicted, and yes, that include the presence of K-300 Bastion anti-ship missile system. After this, the question of how to cost-effectively solve the missions of the Finnish Navy in this threat environment was looked into, including a number of different configurations with vessels of different sizes and roles and in different combinations. Unsurprisingly, it was concluded that due to operational and tactical flexibility as well as economic factors (including both acquisition and life-cycle costs) a single class of multipurpose vessels was preferable over numerous different designs specialising in one or two roles and operating together. I’ve earlier discussed the issue of trying to coordinate different ships into a working unit, ensuring that the right one is always in the right place. A metaphor could be the merger of light, medium, heavy, infantry, and cavalry tanks as well as the tank destroyer into the jack-of-all-trades Main Battle Tank. Other alternatives that were looked into was transferring whole or part of the missions to air- or ground-based systems, but this was also deemed impossible to implement cost-effectively. Especially as e.g. mining require vessels out at sea in any case.

Screenshot 2017-03-21 at 19.52.23
An infographic depicting the timeline for all major surface units, including scheduled service date, MLU, decommisiong, as well as roles and capabilities. Source: Finnish MoD

This then caused the slight growth in size compared to the current mine ships, as the vessel needs to be able to fit numerous weapons and their sensors, as well as maintaining the crew complement and provisions needed for prolonged stays out at sea during escort or surveillance missions. Something which hasn’t been widely discussed is the need for speed. While the light fast attack crafts have impressive sprint speed, their ability to transit a high speeds over longer distances isn’t stellar, especially if you encounter adverse weather. In the same way, while a Ferrari might be faster than a Land Rover on the Nürburgring, the roles would quickly be reversed if they set off on a bumpy dirt road through the Finnish forests. The larger size does also allow for the ability to operate in ice, as well as better resistance to combat damage due to compartmentalisation.

Still, the size won’t grow too much. Partly because larger vessels aren’t an end in itself, and partly because both acquisition and life-cycle costs grow with the hull size. The Navy also face an issue with having a limited number of crew members with which to man the vessels. All of these factor in, and has lead to the current design. Importantly, keeping the total length around 100 meters and the draft low means that the vessels can use the current naval infrastructure in the Finnish archipelago, including the current network of secondary bases and the extensive network of inshore waterways.

Screenshot 2017-03-21 at 19.53.11
The 7 meter long and 900 kg heavy 1:15 scale hull model is pushed through the ice as part of the test program. Source: Finnish MoD

The hull form has been finalised, and scale test have been performed with an eye on different requirements. These include both resistance, manoeuvring, and ice-going capability. In addition, the new propeller design has been tested in full scale on the Navy’s auxilliary FNS Louhi. As was expected, the vessels will have a drop of MEKO-blood in them, as the concept has been fine-tuned by German design bureau MTG-Marinetechnik GmbH.

Sumua
FNS Hämeenmaa (02) showing the 57 mm Bofors Mk I. Source: Puolustusvoimat

For the weapons and sensors, the RFI resulted in a number of suitable packages being identified, all fitting within the budget. One of these will then be chosen, with the (foreign) main supplier being responsible for providing an integrated warfighting capability (sensors, weapons, C3I, battlefield management, and so forth). One interesting change which I did not expect was the renaming of the anti-ship missiles from meritorjuntaohjus (sea-defence missile) to pintatorjuntaohjus (surface-defence missile), with the Navy’s new missile being slated to become PTO2020. It is possible that this change reflects the secondary land-attack capability many modern missiles have. The PTO2020 program is handled as its own program as it is destined for both the updated Hamina, the corvettes, and the land-based launchers. As such it is not included in the 1.2 billion Euro price tag of the corvettes, as is the case with the new light ASW-torpedo which will be acquired as part of the Hamina MLU.

In addition to these systems, several systems will also be transferred from the Rauma- and Hämeenmaa-classes, as well as from the already decommissioned Pohjanmaa. These include the deck guns, towed arrays, decoy launchers, mine-laying equipment, and fire control director. The deck gun is an interesting issue, as the Rauma is equipped with the Bofors 40 mm, of which there are four, while the Hämeenmaa feature the 57 mm Bofors Mk I, a considerably more suitable weapon for a corvette. Still, the Mk I is quite a bit older than the corresponding 57 mm Bofors Mk 3 which is found on the Hamina, and as we all know there are only two Hämeenmaa vessels in service. However, it is possible that there are more guns in storage, as the two scrapped Helsinki-class vessels as well as the Pohjanmaa also had a single 57 mm Bofors Mk I each, and the Finnish Defence Forces is famous for not throwing away something that might prove useful further down the line. As a matter of fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if the current guns mounted on the Hämeenmaa-class are these recycled Helsinki-class guns… In any case, I expect to see the 57 mm Bofors L/70 mounted on the corvettes, and probably upgrade to a Mk 3-ish standard in order to be able to fire smart ammunition remotely.

The decoy launcher is more straightforward, as both classes feature the modern Rheinmetall MASS. The towed arrays currently in service are the active Kongsberg ST2400 variable-depth sonar and the SONAC PTA passive sonar. Very little information is available on the latter, but it is understood to be a rather conventional system well suited for littoral operations with both narrow- and broadband waterfall displays. As the current number of arrays has been quite small, and as the Hamina will also take up the ASW-role as part of their MLU, it is entirely possible that more arrays will be acquired. It is also unclear if all corvettes will get both active and passive arrays, or whether they will be limited to either mode of operation.

img_4914
The scale model shown by Saab at Euronaval 2016, featuring a Giraffe 4A and a 1X above it in the cut-outs. This combination of shrouded rotating radars (the cut-outs are for illustrative purposes only) gives both long-range search capability and short-range tracking of rapidly closing targets. Photo: Saab, used with permission

Interestingly, the fire-control sensor is the Saab CEROS 200 radar and optronic tracking fire control director. This will likely strengthen Saab’s already strong offering, as they already have a tried solution for integrating the CEROS into their 9LV combat managment system, together with their RBS15 MK3 missile and Sea Giraffe radars. The 9LV is already a familiar product to the Finnish Navy, and it would come as no surprise if Saab would be the prime contractor for systems integration. Other companies likely in the running include Atlas Elektroniks (prime contractor for the ongoing Pansio-class MLU), Kongsberg (best known for the NSM anti-ship missile, but has a wide portfolio of naval products), and Raytheon (sporting strong references).

Meripuolustuspäivä 2016 – Maritime Defense Day

Once a year the Finnish Navy and Naval Reserve together arrange an invitation only seminar under the name of Meripuolustuspäivä (Maritime defense day). The purpose is to keep up to date with current trends in the field, as well as to enhance contacts and information sharing between the active-duty and reservist members of the Finnish naval community. This year’s edition was held at the Naval Academy in Suomenlinna outside of Helsinki, and was attended by approximately 100 persons, stretching from flag rank officers (active and retired) to cadets, with the civilians coming from the Naval Reserve, marine and defense industry, and other stakeholders. The information in this post comes from both presentations and informal discussions.

Robin Elfving, chairman of the Naval Reserve, during his presentation dealing with the current state and future of the organisation. Source: own picture

The Navy is certainly going places, and while the continued development of Squadron 2020 naturally grabs much of the spotlight, a number of other developments are taking place in the background. The Hamina-class is set to undergo their MLU in the 2018-2021 timespan, and it will mean a significant upgrade in capability for the vessels. Key amongst the changes are the introduction of ASW-capability. This is to mitigate the shortfall in ASW-capable hulls that will take place with the withdrawal of the older Rauma-class. The MTO 85M will also be replaced as discussed in an earlier post, with the new missile being installed on both the Hamina and the corvettes, as well as replacing the truck batteries before 2025. The plan seems to be that the updated Hamina will be the ‘little sister’ of the corvettes, sporting some of the same weapons and capabilities, which will allow for better interoperability between them. The introduction of a proper ASW capability in particular is most welcome, as sub-hunting is a field where search ranges are very limited, making the number of hulls available a key factor. The Navy will now also be able to work up proficiency on new capabilities on the first modified Haminas while waiting for the first corvette to reach operational capacity. In the meantime, further procurements have been made for a number of weapon systems destined to stay in service, and part of the Jurmo-fleet is also destined for a MLU in the near-future.

The last Katanpää-class mine-hunter is set to be handed over by the yard in Italy on the 1 November. The vessel, like its sisters already in Finland, will receive some minor changes to bring it up to standard. On the whole, the Navy is very happy with the class, with representatives noting that the delays and issues during the build phase largely have been related to the handling of the project, and not the vessels themselves.

Squadron 2020 is on track, and enjoys broad political support. Notably the final acquisition decision is not yet taken, as the project is still in the concept phase with the Navy going through the responses received for the RFI. The renders released are described as “artists impressions”, something which Saab’s representative was happy to latch on to and explain that instead of the fixed radarpanels on the latest renders a stealthy radar installation can be created by putting a spinning radar inside the mast. I can see that this is a less expensive solution, but tracking of fast-moving targets such as missiles will naturally suffer. I guess we’ll have to wait and see…

The scale model shown by Saab at Euronaval 2016, featuring a Giraffe 4A and a 1X above it in the cut-outs. This combination of shrouded rotating radars (the cut-outs are for illustrative purposes only) gives both long-range search capability and short-range tracking of rapidly closing targets. Photo: Saab, used with permission

The increased tensions around the Baltic are visible in the everyday work of the Navy. Not only is the Russian Baltic Fleet more active, but also the increased number of vessels being built for export by Russian yards bring traffic to the Gulf of Finland as they undertake sea trials here. The Finnish Defence Forces identify every single vessel moving on the northern Baltic Sea and in the Gulf of Finland, employing whatever method is the most suitable for each individual situation. The Navy is also further increasing its emphasis on readiness, not only as a technical requirement, but also as a state of mind for all personnel involved. This include not only active duty soldiers and seamen, but also conscripts which are now allowed to take part in such readiness operations for which they have received proper training. The Navy of today is first and foremost a readiness organisation.

For the Navy, international cooperation is a must. “We lack the capability to do certain things”, as one officer put it, and this hole is plugged through international cooperation, with Sweden as our single most important partner. The most important initiative is the joint Finnish-Swedish Naval Task Group, which is consistently improved and also the framework under which Finnish and Swedish units participate together in larger multinational exercises.

For the Naval Reserve, it continues its work as a link between the Navy and its reservists, as well as the common denominator for naval reservists throughout the country (including reservists from the coast guard). While the brand amongst active reservists is strong and holds a certain sense of pride, the organisation has now also been making a conscious push to heighten awareness of the naval reserve and its activities outside of currently active reservists, which has included a new website and increased presence in social media. To further enhance discussions in social media, the Naval Reserve also launched its Twitter-guide, including tips on how to take part in the defense and national security debate on said forum. At the same time, equipment-wise the training capabilities have been increased with introduction of more L-class vessels and new canoes for the training of coastal jaegers.

The theme of the panel was Hybrid Warfare, a topic which is as current as it is unclear. Defining what exactly constitutes hybrid war was a challenge in itself, with one definition being the employment of whatever methods work best, regardless of whether they are in line with traditions or any kind of legal/chivalric code. Another definition put forward focused on the use of unconventional methods by conventional actors (i.e. armies or other organised units) OR the use of conventional methods and weapons by irregular actors. A prime example of the first one is the Russian assault on Crimea and further operations in Eastern Ukraine, while the recent attack on Swift by Yemeni rebels (with or without the help of foreign ‘advisers’) using a modern complex weapon system such as a sea-skimming missile is an example of the later. It was also noted that hybrid warfare is a relatively new term in western discussions, and only after its widespread adoption here has Russian sources started using it, and then only as a description of how the west analyses Russia’s operations.

The threat of the unexpected is hard to guard against. Like a cartoon figure not noticing the saw cutting through the floor surrounding you, hybrid warfare works best when the target doesn’t notice that it’s foundation is being weakened. This can be achieved e.g. through the use of knowingly breaking international agreements or codes, such as falsely declaring emergencies to gain access to ports.

The term information warfare was also debated, as the use of (dis)information is a crucial part of any hybrid operation. However, as war usually involves more than one part, if someone is waging an information war against Finland, wouldn’t that mean that we are also conducting a war by defending us? Can we say that Finland is engaged in defensive information warfare? Our current defense largely consists of meeting false accusations and oversimplifications with correct information and facts, but is this also an information operation that qualifies as a kind of warfare?

The panel assembled. Source: own picture

For the information part, it is clear that an orchestrated campaign aimed at tarnishing Finland’s reputation is being waged by Russia. The goal here might be to isolate our country internationally, with a good example of what can happen when your reputation is low being Ukraine’s reputation as suffering from a high rate of corruption, which in turn lessens the willingness of the international community to come to its aid. Another point was made regarding Hungary, with the rhetorical question ‘Who would want to come to their aid if a crises occurred?” being asked. This is reminiscent of smear campaigns being directed against individuals, which e.g. can focus on addressing (often false) discrediting information to their employers or partners, with the aim of silencing or isolating a person.

This then transits over into the fact that the concept of nationalism is seemingly changing. With the increased polarisation and diversification of the Finnish society, the big question is how will “Finnish” be defined in the future? If the only thing defining it is a passport, that will inevitably threaten the unity of our society. With the younger generation seemingly less open to traditional Finlandisation, this seems like a likely target for hostile propaganda.

…and speaking of propaganda: what is really the PR-value of the Admiral Kuznetsov task force slowly heading south under a cloud of black smoke? Because one thing is sure, and that is that the military value the air wing can offer for the Syrian regime forces is limited at best.

Fire among the dunes – Air defence exercise 1/16

At first glance, Vattaja firing range looks like an anachronism in the Finnish Defence Forces. At a time when the force as a whole has largely disappeared from the greater Ostrobothnian area, the location of a minor firing range at the coast seems strange.

However, looking closer, the reasons become clearer. Featuring a considerable stretch of coastline facing the open sea, it allows for joint exercises involving not only ground based units, but fast jets and surface ships as well. Its location far from the Russian listening posts at Gogland (and potential ‘trawlers’ running around in the Gulf of Finland) is also beneficial when practicing emission heavy scenarios, such as anti-air warfare.

Crotale
A Crotale NG system mounted on a Patria XA-181 chassis (local designation ITO90M) awaits the next wave of enemies during the battle phase. Source: author

These benefits are utilised in the twice-yearly series of air defence exercises, simply named “Ilmapuolustusharjoitus” (Air defence exercise), having been renamed for the first edition this year from the earlier “Ilmatorjuntaharjoitus” (Anti-air exercise). The reason for this renaming is unknown, but one guess is that the exercise has evolved to become more of a joint exercise as opposed to a pure ground-based air defence event. The first exercise kicks off in May each year, and IPH 1/16 has been taking place for the last two weeks. The first week, the so called “Firing phase”, emphasizes live firing against both towed and sub-scale targets, while the second week is the “Battle phase” and pits the air force against the ground and surface units in different scenarios (obviously, no live ammunition is used during this phase).

Contrails
Three ‘bogeys’ at one staging area east of the training area proper. Source: author

For the ground forces, forces from three differnt brigades brought more or less everything from the humble NSV 12.7 mm heavy machine gun to the NASAMS 2, including Crotale and Stinger missiles, as well as ZU-23-2 ‘Sergei’ and Oerlikon KD/GDF anti-aircraft guns. The air force, which has overall responsibility for the exercise, brought its F/A-18C Hornet’s, both for their own live firings as well as for target duty/practicing operations against enemy air defence networks. The navy, busy with several exercises during the second half of May and preparing for the upcoming BALTOPS 16 kicking off early June, sent a single Hamina-class FAC, which also performed live firings with its Umkhonto-IR missile system. In addition, the navy brought a small landing craft, probably for SAR duty and for policing the safety zone.

FNS Tornio
Fast attack craft FNS Tornio (’81’), the main contribution of the Navy, visible in the haze off the coast. Source: author

The current state of the Finnish air defence is a hot topic, especially after the launching of the HX-fighter program and the withdrawal of the Buk M1 in favour of the shorter-ranged NASAMS 2. The majority of the gunbased anti-air assets are also approaching the end of their lifespans, and although the Marksman system got reintroduced into action after being transferred from T-55AM to Leopard 2A4 hulls, the air defence is looking worrisomely thin on a longer horizon. Partly to offset this coming reduction in lighter AAA systems and partly to replace older Soviet MANPADS, a considerable (but undisclosed) quantity of FIM-92C Stingers where bought, with the first having been fired last year at ITH 2/15, and more being employed this year. A Finnish particular is the tactics to use cherry pickers as launch platforms. These are employed to get above the treetops to secure a good enough line of fire. As Finland is heavily forested and relatively flat, launching the missiles from the ground gives little time for spotting and acquiring a firing solution when hostile aircraft approach at low level and high speed.

Stinger
Conscript with Stinger launcher in a cherry picker, catching a break after a low-level pass by two Hornets. Source: author

An interesting visitor this year was Saab’s Special Flight Operations’ Learjet 35 which flew target flights. The aircraft can perform both target towing and different electronic warfare missions, missions which have earlier been handled by the air force’s own Learjets. The plane has the ability to fly “adversary flight profiles with or without Electronic Counter Measures (ECM) for AA and AD systems”, and it did employ aggressive flight tracks at low altitude over the training range. While Saab won’t comment on exactly which EW systems are mounted aboard at any given time, the aircraft did feature two unspecified (and different) pods, and it is interesting to note that Gripen’s active EW suit is one of its stronger sales points, with already the 39C apparently being able to give “nasty shocks” to RAF Typhoon pilots. It is entirely possible that the air force took the opportunity to get a feel for Saab’s EW know-how in advance of the proper HX evaluation (or that Saab took the opportunity to demonstrate their products, whichever way one looks upon it).

Saab
One of Saab’s Learjets, SE-DHP, during a low pass over the training area. Source: author

A closing statement on the pictures taken during the exercise: all pictures were taken from outside the exercise area, and in several instances there were officers standing close by, apparently okay with me running around with a tele lens. A few of the pictures were taken so that they show part of the area declared off limits to the general public for the duration of the exercise. Despite reading through the notice posted at the site and checking for signs in the terrain, I found no indication that photography was prohibited or restricted (with the exception of flying targets due to safety hazards). Still, I have used my own judgement and left out certain observations/pictures from this post, due to the potentially revealing nature of these.

Oerlikon
A ‘Sergei’ blasting away at an incoming Hornet. Source: author

Red April – The Harmaja Subhunt

Finnish territory apparently was intruded upon yesterday and today (27-28.04.2015). It is only logical to compare this to the so called Red October-incident that took place within Swedish waters last autumn, and while I am aware that others have already done so, I decided to have a go at it anyway.

The Intrusion

First a recap of the events: Yesterday an underwater listening station picked up a “loud and clear” sound that indicated the presence of underwater activity outside of Harmaja, at the outskirts of Helsinki. The vessel on call, mine ship FNS Uusimaa, was called to the scene. Sometimes later, the second vessel on call, fast attack craft FNS Hanko, was alerted, and the Finnish border guards were informed. The border guards responded by sending the patrol vessel VL Turva. Of note is that the most competent ASW-ships in the Finnish navy, the Rauma-class fast attack crafts, are all temporarily out of service since February, due to hull cracks. Of the three vessels involved, only Uusimaa can be said to have a serious anti-submarine capability, with Turva not being armed in peacetime and Hanko lacking in search equipment.

VL Turva, the brand new flagship of the Finnish border guards. Source: Wikimedia Commons/Cha già José

Still, contact was renewed around 01:30 in the early hours of today (28.04.2015), and after the “underwater object” had been tracked for around an hour and a half, the Commanding Officer of Uusimaa decided to fire warning charges. These are not depth charges per se, but rather small handheld charges that detonate underwater, their aim being to tell the submarine “We know you’re there, and we don’t like it. Please move on!”

At around 03:00, six charges were dropped by Uusimaa, the result of which was that “no further warnings, or depth charges, were needed”. In other words, the underwater object left Finnish waters. Later today the naval vessels left the scene of the operation, while the border guards have started an investigation into the incident. The investigation includes going through all acquired material, and may take weeks. Obviously, major parts of the investigation will probably never be released to the public, due to the sensitive nature of the information, e.g. the location and capabilities of the underwater listening stations.

To note is that so far the nature of the “underwater object” has not been confirmed, but a small submarine seems to be the most likely culprit. However, this gives Finland and Sweden an opportunity to “compare notes”, and check if it was the same intruder, and what can be learnt from these two incidents.

Similarities

To begin with, the obvious case is that both non-aligned nations in northern Europe have seen their waters intruded upon by an unknown nation within the time span of less than a year (curiously enough, none of the NATO-states have reported the same thing). In both cases, it happened during the interregnum after parliamentary elections. In Finland’s case, today was the day Juha Sipilä officially got the mission to form a government.

If this is a message aimed at scaring Finland away from NATO by a show of force, I believe it will fail. Most probably, it will not have any major effect on the Finnish opinion, and in the case it does, it will most probably only give the pro-NATO side a small push forwards.

FNS Uusimaa (05). Suorce: Puolustusvoimat
FNS Uusimaa (05) firing ASW rockets. These are the probable weapon of choice if the order to destroy the intruder would have been issued. Suorce: Puolustusvoimat

In both cases, the navy responded in force, and was rather open with information about the event (and in both cases, the press was happy to fly over the area with their helicopters to provide live feeds). I would especially like to express my appreciation of the open and straightforward communication with the public that the navy initiated, something that has not always been the case.

The Differences

There are, however, notable differences. First and foremost, while the Swedish operation was deep inside Swedish waters, the Finnish contact was on the edge of Finnish territory. This meant that the Finnish operation was of a very different nature, with the main aim seemingly being to chase away the intruder. As far as I know, there was never any use of either alert or depth charges during the Swedish operation, which might be an indication of the Finnish vessels acquiring a better fix on their target (the other alternative is that the Swedish vessels were trying to fire for effect, which naturally requires a higher degree of target identification than alert charges).

An interesting detail is that while the Finnish navy described similar incidents as “rare”, with the last two taking place in 2004, the Swedish navy stated that similar incidents had indeed taken place earlier. Edit 29042015: Finnish officials today confirmed that with “similar incidents”, only incidents when alert charges were dropped are counted. They refused to comment on the issue whether underwater intruders were as rare. No exact numbers exist from either country, but the question whether this was a one-off incident, or whether someone will start testing Finland’s defences more often remains open for now.

A noteworthy feature is the reaction of Russian media. When Sweden started their subhunt, it took a few days for Russian national media before they got their propaganda machine going and started to create new theories. In this case, the news reports started coming instantly from Russian sources. RIA Novosti quoted Deputy Defence Minister Anatoly Antonov, who commented, negatively, about “reports of alleged appearances by Russian submarines in the territorial waters”. So far, no official Finnish channel has identified the object as a Russian submarine. Sputnik (which opened their Finnish service earlier this week) drew parallels with the Swedish operation, where “Sweden accused Russia of operating a submarine in its waters, later found to be a Swedish vessel”. As far as I know, no Swedish official channel identified the submarine as Russian, and contrary to the article, the main incident was later confirmed to have been a midget submarine, while another reported sighting was downgraded to have been of a Swedish vessel.

The operation also highlights the differences in ASW-tactics between the Finnish and Swedish navies. While the Swedish navy employs a more traditional approach centred on vessels equipped with both sensors and weaponry, supported by helicopters and some underwater listening stations at strategic places, the Finnish tactic is based around the fact that our coastal waters are shallow and broken up by numerous islands and shoals. Thus, the underwater listening stations function like an early warning system, which locate intruders, and based on this information surface vessels can then be alerted to the scene to get a better picture of the situation, and if needed either chase away or destroy the intruder. Of note is also that the Finnish border guards were heavily involved in the operation, unlike their Swedish colleagues. Partly, this is due to the small number of surface vessels in the Finnish navy that are capable of an operation like this, a number that is set to diminish even more with the replacement of three mine ships and four Rauma-class FAC with an unknown number of MTA 2020-corvettes.

The Finnish operation seems to have been a text-book example of how the Finnish ASW-machinery is supposed to work, and based on open sources all involved rightfully deserves credit for this. Some media have praised the Finnish operation as an example of resolute action, in which the enemy was driven away by the use of arms, and put this into contrast with the more modest (or even haphazard) Swedish way of chasing submarines.

I do not share this view.

The Finnish navy did not “bomb” anybody, and never fired with the intent to kill or damage. Dropping alert charges is the closest one can come to communicating with a foreign underwater vessel, and the step to actually making an attack run with full-size depth charges is rather long. Also, while the concentrated effort of three (for Finland) large vessels is impressive, it is dwarfed by the Swedish armada of corvettes, mine hunters, helicopters, and marines with their landing crafts, that spent the better part of a week hunting through the archipelago. The Swedish helicopters might lack dipping sonar, but so does the Finnish ones, and unlike Sweden, Finland has no plans to acquire a heli-based ASW-capability. While the Finnish operation was well executed, the same can be said about the Swedish.

Svensk-Finsk ubåtsjakt: Finsk ubåtsjaktsförmåga

The following text is published in Swedish, as it is part of a post published in concert with two Swedish bloggers, dealing with the prospects of a joint Finnish-Swedish submarine hunting exercise/operation.

Gemensam Svensk – Finsk ubåtsjakt på svenskt vatten (Reservofficer)

 Under Folk och Försvars Rikskonferens i Sälen meddelade försvarsministrarna för Sverige och Finland att ett förslag om gemensam ubåtsjakt i svenska vatten kommer att läggas under året.
För att lyckas med det krävs interoperabilitet, att lednings- och sambandssystem pratar med varandra, delning av gemensam lägesbild, ett operativt ledningskoncept, ett svenskt HNS-koncept samt styrningar från respektive regering. Det sistnämnda lämnar vi helt därhän i detta inlägg, vi fokuserar på likheter, skillnader, utmaningar och möjligheter inom respektive lands ubåtsjaktsförmåga.
Av det skälet har två svenska bloggare och en finsk bloggare skrivit detta inlägg gemensamt. Förhoppningen är att sprida ljus över nuläge, behov och vägen framåt och därmed stimulera alla parter att göra sitt yttersta för att förverkliga politikernas beslut.
Reservofficer inleder med HNS (Host Nation Support), Klart Skepp skriver därefter ur svenskt perspektiv och inlägget avslutar med att Corporal Frisk ger ett finskt perspektiv.

HNS (Reservofficer)

Det svenska HNS-konceptet för gemensamma marina övningar med Finland är väl prövat. Finland och Sverige har också samarbetat vid markinsats där verkstaden i Mazar-e-sharif kanske är det bästa exemplet. Sverige och Finland har erfarenheter från tre nordiska stridsgrupper där det funnits anledning att testa svensk HNS. Vi har ju det bejublade exemplet med ammunitions- och vapentransporten under NBG 11 som ÖB berörde när vi ställde frågan om HNS på Folk och försvars rikskonferens.

Dock måste man konstatera att Sverige och Finland inte samverkat vid skarp marin insats ännu även om båda nationerna bidragit till operation ATALANTA i Aden-viken. Men däremot har det övats friskt tillsammans. En eloge bör gå till Amfibieregementet i Sverige och Nylands brigad i Finland där respektive kustjägarkompani, ömsom i Finland ömsom i Sverige, samövat under ett tiotal år.
De för ämnet mest relevanta övningarna torde vara SWEFINEX, Northern Coasts, SWENEX och BALTOPS. Det var under SWENEX del två hösten 2013 som marininspektören Jan Thörnqvist beskrev visionen om en svensk-finsk gemensam marin styrka för krishantering.
Sveriges förmåga till HNS för marina enheter prövades under 2014 främst under övningen Northern Coasts. Under den övningen genomfördes en omfattande HNS-verksamhet med erfarenhetsvärden som har stor betydelse för ett mer improviserat handlande som en ubåtsjakt kan ställa krav på. Bl a upprättades en framskjuten logistikbas (FLS) genom att ta till vara en nedlagd industrianläggning som med snabba och relativt små anpassningar kunde fungera som krigsbas för ett flertal marina förband och understödjande förband. (Vi ger inga detaljer om var och hur).
Även övningen BALTOPS är intressant ur svensk HNS-synpunkt eftersom övningen inleddes i Karlskrona i början på juni förra året. Nu kanske inte Karlskrona är något bra exempel eftersom Marinbasen ligger där. Det finns ingen bättre plats i Sverige att ta emot utländska flottstyrkor och ombesörja HNS på ett bra sätt. Men planering och genomförande av logistik, utredning av ekonomiska och juridiska förhållanden som kännetecknar allt HNS-arbete fick man ta höjd för så övningen hade sitt syfte, den saken är klar.
Sammantaget kan man säga att de svenska erfarenheterna av att ge HNS till finska förband är ganska god. Svensk HNS-förmåga i samband med övningar planerade med lång framförhållning är mycket god. Däremot är HNS-förmågan i Sverige aldrig prövat i skarp insats. Sverige har i viss mån bristande förmåga att klara HNS vid kortare framförhållning. Slutsatsen är att om Sverige skall klara att lämna HNS till finska marina styrkor – eller till vilka förband som helst – som skall hjälpa oss vid en skarp insats så måste detta övas och vi måste börja öva som ryssarna – ej föranmälda beredskapsövningar – s.k. snap drills. Det räcker dock inte – HNS avtal måste upprättas i fredstid, alltså det som är målet med det MOU som Sverige och Finland skrev med NATO i september.
När det gäller just Finland så är det rimligt att teckna avtal hela vägen ner till JIA (Joint Implementation Agreement) mot bakgrund av erfarenhetsvärden från ovan nämnda övningar. Det är faktiskt sannolikt ett krav i kombination med ovan nämnda oannonserade beredskapsövningar. Annars är risken stor att dyrbara timmar i insatsens initiala skede går förlorade.

Svenskt perspektiv (Klart Skepp):

Foto: PONTUS LUNDAHL / TT

Bakgrund svensk-finska marina relationer (post murens fall)

Sverige och Finland är ju – vad en amerikan skulle säga – “joined at the hip” därom råder naturligtvis inga tvivel. Avseende marinsamverkan så har vi i modern tid (här definierat som post murens fall) genomfört bi- och multilaterala övningar/operationer tillsammans.

För att nämna några: Lovisa, SWEFINEX, BALTOPS, Northern Coast samt minröjningsoperationer typ Open Spirit (?). Under bilaterala övningar har normalt sett ett gemensamt interim-sambandssystem etablerats. Den svensk-finska relationen och utbytet på förbandsnivå är mycket god.

På amfibiesidan har den svenska amfibiekåren samövat med den finska sedan slutet av 90-talet och gemensamt har man satt upp en styrka, tidigare benämnd “ATU” (Amphibious Task Unit) eller “SFATU” (Swedish Finnish ATU) tillsammans med Nylands brigad (det finska förbandet i huvudsak svenskspråkigt, men med kommandospråk finska – i sin nationella roll). Efter deklaration av den förra svenska försvarsministern, Karin Enström, och hennes finske motsvarighet, Carl Haglund, pekades specifikt amfbieförbandens samarbete ut som ett fördjupningsområde.

Sedan början 2000 har Sverige och Finland samverkat runt sjölägesbild i ett system benämnt SUCFIS som innebär att vi kan dela lägesbild. Systemet möjliggör att dela hela- eller valda delar av informationen då det finns diverse säkerhetslösningar inbyggda i systemet. SUFIS utökades för övrigt 2008 till att omfatta samtliga länder runt Östersjön utom Ryssland och går då under namnet SUCBAS. Jag uppfattar dock att det svensk-finska systemet möjliggör ett intimare samarbete än SUCBAS.

Scenario och avgränsningar

I fortsättningen utgår vi ifrån dagens situation med befintliga medel istället för att tillåta oss några utsvävningar och allmänna fantasier om möjlig tillförd utrustning. Baserat på detta betraktar vi höstens “underrättelseoperation” benämnd “Örnen” som ett scenario att basera analysen på vad ett svensk-finskt samarbete skulle kunna tillföra i ekvationen.
Nedanstående ses endast möjligt att teoretiskt gälla under fred. I en direkt kris-/krigssituation kommer andra överväganden att ligga till grund för eventuella samarbeten.

Jag ska direkt deklarera att jag inte har någon färsk uppdatering på finska ubåtsjaktresurser. Vad jag nämner nedan är framgooglat på nätet. Felaktigheter förekommer med all säkerhet och ingen vikt har lagts vid att faktakolla alla detaljer och möjliga skeenden.

Syftet är att översiktligt göra en ansats och diskutera runt denna. Syftet är inte att fastna i någo pre-pubertal orgie i taktiska/tekniska detaljer.

Följande enheter anser jag kan utgöra ett underlag att involvera i en svensk ubåtsjakt inomskärs. 

Hämeenmaa MCM: 20 kn, 1300 ton, Besättning (?) Sonar: Simrad SS 304 samt möjligen förmåga att ta ombord ST2400 VDS. Vapen: AU-raket, Sjunkbomber


Foto: Finska försvarsmakten

4 x Hamina FAC:  32 kn, 270 ton, släpsonar (Simrad) samt en passiv towed array, 29 (värnpliktiga/underbefäl) + 5 (officerare). Ledningssystem från EADS. IR-spanare samt elektrooptiakt sikte. Lämpliga vapen?

4 x Rauma FAC: 30 kn, 218 ton, 24 (vpl/ubef) + 5 (Off). Ny uppgraderad VDS, Ledningssystem från Saab 9LV Mk4 samt sikte med TV/IR. Vapen 4 st AU-granatkastare

2 x Katanpää MCM (1 till under leverans 2014 (?)): 13 kn, ca 700 ton, 36 (vpl/ubef) + 6 (off) Diverse obemannade farkoster: Kongsberg HUGIN AUV, Kongsberg REMUS 100 AUV, Saab Underwater Systems Double Eagle Mark II ROV, Atlas Elektronik SeaFox
Sonarer: Kongsberg EM-710 RD multibeam echosounder Kongsberg TOPAS echosounder Klein Associates Klein 5500 towed side-scanning sonar Kongsberg HiPAP underwater positioning system

36 st Jurmo Stridsbåtar.
Jag nämner bara dessa här då de skulle kunna användas, men jag är tveksam till att stridsvärdet är särskilt högt efter en ombasering på egen köl över ett potentiellt stormigt hav där både båtar och människor går sönder. Bättre vore att använda svenska stridsbåtar med en mixad besättning där de finska soldaterna/sjömännen flygs in.

(Kustjägare under landstigning. Ref James Mashiri)

Kustbrigaden: Sjöspanare med tekniska system så som radar, eletrooptisk materiel för spaning

Kommande är att Finnarna håller på att få leverans av nya båtar med fjärrstyrda vapenstationer. Undertecknad vet däremot inte om finnarnas version är utrustad med IR, men är den det kan det vara intressant då spanings- och dokumentationsmöjligheten ökar.

Anm.) HMS (Hull Mounted Sonar) VDS (Variable Depth Sonar – populärt kallad “fisk” som kan sänkas upp och ned igenom diverse salt- och temperaturskikt).

Den finska gränsbevakningen har tillgång till två stycken Dornier DO-228 utrustade med radar och elektro-optik. Jag bedömer att det är bättre att svenska kustbevakningen sätter in ett-två av sina plan i Sverige samt att de finska planen utökar sina spaningsområden/intensiferar sina flygningar för att avlasta de svenska enheterna.

Jag kan inte finna på några ubåtsjakthelikoptrar i den finska uppställningen.

Kriterier för förslag till urval från ovan nämnda underlag består av

Stridsekonomi/uthållighet.

Vi vet redan att en ubåtsjakt denna kaliber kräver en hel del personella och materiella resurser. Den finska bemanningen av fartyg och förband med värnpliktiga kan göra att uthålligheten kan öka och att större yttäckning kan nås. Antagandet bygger på att finsk lag medger beordring av värnpliktiga till denna typ av insats. Tveksamt om uthålligheten är en knäckfråga med tanke på en “besökares” förmodade tid i området (se tid nedan). Kopplat mot hur snabbt inkallelse för finska enheter kan ske så kostar en hel del att ha nödvändig beredskap (jourtillägg osv).

Tid till insats
(inkallande – embarkering- ombasering – debarkering och gruppering – påbörjande av att lösa uppgift)

Vi kan nog inte räkna med att tiden mellan en “besökares” INFIL till EXFIL är mycket längre än 3-7 dagar. Kan EXFIL  hindras genom instängning i lämpligt område kan naturligtvis tiden förlängas. Antagandet kräver att INFIL upptäcks relativt omgående om vi ska hinna med i OODA-loopen. Kan man via fasta finska system lyckas få en tidig förvarning ger det en större möjlighet att få till en intercept precis vid INFIL, men det kräver sannolikt passage från finska viken och inte från Kaliningrad/Baltijsk (där Marina Spetsnaz OMRP 561 och ubåtsflottan är utgångsgrupperad).

Interoperabilitet

Det är naturligtvis en fördel om formatet/länkarna på stridsledningen är av samma typ. Att Rauma har ett Saab-ledningssystem kan underlätta då i bästa fall mer handlar om en kryptofråga för att lösa interoperabiliteten. Att gå via Länk 16 möjligt, men riskerar att kanske fördröja en del samt att funktionaliteten nedgår.  Jag är tyvärr dåligt uppdaterad på detaljer i denna fråga.

Interoperabilitet är ju inte bara en teknikfrågor utan i högsta grad en kultur och språkfråga. Att Nylands brigad ingår ses som en självklarhet. Övrig interoperabilitet t.ex. inom logistik (förnödenhetsförsörjning, HNS, sjukvård osv) bör nog baseras på en Nato-struktur som vid det här laget bör vara ordentligt samövad.

Bibehållandet av en nationell gard

Det är varken önskvärt eller sannolikt att tro att finnarna vill lämna sin egen bakgård tom för att stötta en svensk ubåtsjaktoperation. Av denna anledning har ett begränsat antal finska enheter av de ovan nämnda valts för att medge en realistisk möjlighet att hantera nationellt uppkomna situationer.

Ev denna orsak är t.ex. inte Hämeenmaa och Hamina utvalda. De skulle – om en analys från finsk sida så medger – också kunna användas.

Förslag som följer

3-4 st Rauma

Motivering:

Relativt små och grundgående enheter (1,5 m) med Saab-ledningssystem. Dessutom TV/IR-sikte samt AU-granater. Vapen kan i och för sig orsaka en del juridiska komplikationer. Vad händer om ett finskt statsfartyg skadar eller sänker ett främmande statsfartyg på svenskt inre vatten? Detta är nog en viktig fråga att belysa om man ser framför sig att göra en vapeninsats. Därför ser jag att uppgiften i första hand handlar om att dokumentera kränkning.

Samma enheter medför mindre jobb med reservdelar, kopplingar, integrationsarbete osv.

Uppgift: 

Delta i ubåtsjakt inomskärs. Tyvärr har Rauma ingen HMS.

1-2 Katanpää

En mycket kompetent plattform som det verkar med en hel del sensorsystem. Hennes uppgift skulle vara att dels bevaka utlopp, men också att utgöra en enhet som deltar vid sökning i en situation med instängd ubåt. Hennes autonoma undervattensfarkoster och sonar-suite är sannolikt till stor nytta. Ett överslag säger att hon teoretiskt sett skulle kunna vara på plats i Stockholmsområdet på ca 24 timmar.

Enheter från Nylands brigad

  • Ekenäs Kustbataljons 2. Kustkompaniet för signalister, båtförare/besättningar och underhållsmän
  • Vasa kustjägarbataljons Kustjägarbataljon

Eventuellt deltager de som mixade besättningar i svenska stridsbåtar (obs kommandodspråk är finska – föreslår att finska besättningar övar på svenska båtar och vice versa) samt grupperar för fast spaning. Beredduppgift genomföra sökoperationer på öar osv. I en situation där en ubåt har spärrats in i ett – förhoppningsvis – geografiskt avgränsat område är uppgiften att upptäcka/hindra EXFIL till fots. Förnödenhetsförsöjning och avlösning ställer krav med så mycket folk ute i operationsområdet. Det är möjligt att amfibiebataljonens underhållsresurser löser ut detta utan tillförande av enheter utifrån. Logistiken bör rimligtvis inte vara allt för tung i det beskrivna scenariot.

Enheter från den nybildade Kustbrigaden (tidigare Finska vikens marinkommando)

Sjöövervakare med sin materiel i form av radarer och elektrooptiska sensorer. Oklart om dessa är portabla eller monterade i båtar/fordon. Om det senare gäller kan denna materiel inte ses som aktuell att disponera.

Ur ett kostnadsperspektiv är det önskvärt att nyttja en lejonpart av de finska beväringarna (jo, jag tror finnarna använder denna benämning på sina värnpliktiga) – om man, från finsk sida, ursäktar detta svenska snyltresonemang förstås.

Amfibieenheten är de som snabbast skulle kunna vara på plats om man har helikoptrar/transportflygplan i en någorlunda hög beredskap. Det bör noteras att endast de enheter som ingår i SFATU är helikopterutbildade. Kanske måste transportplan därför användas för delar av de ingående komponenterna.

Övriga enheter/funktioner

SUCFIS utgör naturligtvis fortsatt en gemensam sjöövervaknings. Möjligen kan arbetet med att detaljera ytläget stöttas av den finska sidan.

Ett spelat scenario kallat “Örnen 2” för att testa tider och logik

Foto: TT


Notera att skeendena nedan inte är analyserade på djupet. Det finns garanterat många operativa-, taktiska- och tekniska felaktigheter. Syfte är som sagt att testa lite tider och händelser ur en högre aspekt. Vidare är scenariot sett ur ett “best case”-alternativ. Logistiska och beslutsmässiga friktioner har inte beaktats. 

D1 – Starka indikationer som påvisar främmande undervattensaktivitet föranleder den svenska militära ledningen att hemställa hos politikerna om ett utlösande av det finska alternativet till stöd. Beslutet tar ett dygn innan det landar in hos den finske försvarsministern som redan fått informationen underhand via diplomatiska kanaler. Den finske försvarsministern är inte överraskad då man i sina fasta system har noterat en ökad aktivitet över tid.

D2 – Den finska försvarsmakten börjar kalla in nyckelbesättningar till fartyg och soldater ur Kustbrigaden samt Nylands brigad. Fartygen är bunkrade och korrekt RU (reglementerad utrustning) finns ombord. Rauma hade tack och lov inte prioriterat ordinarie robotlast på 6 robotar och var konfigurerade för ubåtsjakt. Listor för förnödenhetskomplettering skicka i förväg till det svenska HNS-stödet. Transporthelikoptrar/transportflyg (både svenska och finska – utifrån tillgång och lämplig utgångsgruppering) anländer för att ta ombord trupp enheter ur Kustbrigaden och Nylands brigad.

D3 – De första fartygen har kastat loss med sina nyckelbesättningar för omgruppering till Stockholm. Resterande besättning flygs in antingen reguljärt eller med militär transport.

Under natten till D3 har de första enheterna ur Kustbrigaden och Nylands brigad debarkerat på Berga. Indelning och gruppering till uppgift tilldelas innan enheterna fördelas ut på båtar och öar för rörlig/fast spaning i operationsområdet. Om det är möjligt läggs minsystem M9 (beslut har funnits att avveckla detta under 2014) ut i mindre sund för att förstärka spaningen. Helikoptrar och G-båtar används för att “hoppa bock” med spaningsgrupperna.

Över huvudena på de nyanlända soldaterna cirklar då och då den svenska kustbevakningens flygplan med uppgift att försöka upptäcka möjliga värmesignaturer med sina EO-sensorer. Allokeringen till denna uppgift har varit möjlig då den finska gränsbevakningen har erbjudit sig att utöka sina spaningsrutter.

På kvällen D3 anländer de första Rauma-robotbåtarna till operationsområdet där besättningarna embarkerar. Under på morgontimmarna D4 börjar fartygens stridsledningar att bli operativa där rätt kryptonycklar och frekvensplaner har  erhållits och matats in i systemen. System- och sambandskontroller genomförs kryptomaskinerna blinkar ilsket blått i takt med att måldata och ordar fyller etern.

På morgonen D4 anmäler sig de finska enheterna som operativa till styrkechefen.

Frågan är nu om man ska dela in de finska fartygen i en egen Task unit eller om de ska blandas för att kunna använda systemens olika frekvenser och karakteristik på ett bättre sätt. Det sistnämnda väljs och korvetterna bäddas in med de svenska enheterna.

D4 – På morgonen har även två Katanpää anlänt och dirigeras till att bevaka var sitt utlopp i den södra delen av skärgården. Väl på plats sätter de i sina obemannade undervattensfarkoster och börjar sökning i närområdet, samtidigt som de effektivt spärrar av sina tilldelade utlopp.

De tillförda enheterna medger nu tillräcklig numerär för att öka kvalitén i bevakning av alternativa utlopp för EXFIL. Styrkechefen vågar sig på att sätta igång ett drev från norr med en Visby- och en Raumakorvett De senare med den unika förmågan, ur svenska ögon sett, att kunna avge verkanseld med sina AU-granater. Många ögon finns nu utplacerade på land och i stridsbåtar för att observera aktivitet. Båtar med förnödenheter till de olika grupperna på land och i båtarna pilar av och an för att leverera varm mat och reservdelar till de olika grupperna.

D5-D7 – En lång period av inaktivitet med få till inga indikationer. Inkräktaren bedöms ligga och trycka och enheterna genomsöker metodiskt området. Skärpt bevakning har beordrats för att detektera eller hindra EXFIL till fots.

Under denna tidsperiod kommer rapporter in om en ubåtsindikation vid Sandhamn i mellanskärgården. Styrkechefen väljer att endast detachera ett fåtal enheter till området i syfte att kunna bibehålla en effektiv inringning. En svensk ubåts spaningsruta justeras något för att möta situationen.

D8 – Plötsligt får en minjakt kontakt med en “möjlig ubåt” som senare kan klassas upp som “konstaterad ubåt”. Minakten lyckas hålla kontakten och samtliga två Rauma leds in av Visby som också lyckas få kontakt med ekot. De bägge Raumafartygen leds in och levererar var sin full salva med AU-granater som bedöms ligga korrekt över målet. Två detonationer registreras av såväl sonarsystem- som människor ombord på de omgivande fartygen/båtarna. Luftuppkok och olja observeras av enheterna på ytan.

När vattnet lugnat ned sig skickar minjakten ned sin obemannade farkost och får direkt kontakt med ett till synes intakt ubåtsskrov med två femkronestora hål i – ett i fören och ett akter om tornet. Ubåten klassificeras senare av dykare som en  ubåt av typen Projekt 865 Piranja. Bägge sidotuberna är tomma och luckorna är öppna. En av två Proton-dykfarkoster kan inte återfinnas….

….. Avslutningen kan ses vara lite dramatisk, men syftet är att glida över i en politisk och juridisk frågeställning. Vad gäller om en finsk enhet sänker eller skadar ett utländskt statsfartyg på svenskt inre vatten? Stödjer svensk lag ett sådant agerande? Vad säger finsk lag? Vem är ansvarig? Vad måste göras för att omhänderta ett sådant scenario.

Möjligheter

  • Möjlighet att få till en ökad numerär som medger en förbättring (om än inte tillräcklig)
  • Samverkan medger en möjlighet till reduktion av fasta kostnader relativt den förmågeökning som kan erhållas i fredstid. Ett krigs/konfliktscenario kan komma att se helt annorlunda ut.

Frågeställningar

  • Går det att tillräckligt snabbt samla ihop en ubåtsjaktstyrka?
    Vilka avtal, strukturer och mandat måste finnas på plats?
  • Lagstiftning – både nationell och internationell (t.ex. folkrätt) krävs.
    Finland har redan påbörjat sitt arbete med detta och en lagändring förväntas kunna gå igenom 2015/2016 som medger finsk hjälp på svenskt territorium.
  • Vilken ROE ska gälla? Mandat för verkanseld?

Konklusion

    • Den typ av beredskap som krävs för att hinna agera och samla ihop styrkorna kommer att vara kostnadsdrivande. Det kommer att kosta, men vi kan snabbt läcktäta inom tappad numerär

  • Speed is of essence!
  • Den finske försvarsministern, Carl Haglund, har klart och tydligt deklarerat att man måste se på ett samarbetet på ett nyktert sätt.

    Det får inte bli en politisk illusion om att ett starkt eget försvar inte behöver prioriteras.

    Till syven och sist måste bägge nationerna planera och agera som om att man stod ensam.

    • Samarbetet gäller endast under fredstid (ref Carl Haglund)
    • Diversifiering i teknik kan utgöra en styrka
    • Obemannade system (liknande de ombord på fartyg av Katanpää-klass) borde utredas för inköp av svenska marinen.
    • Sambands- och ledningssystem behöver vara naturligtvis vara interoperabla

      (utmaning ur t.ex. ett svenskt LOU-perspektiv?).

  • Det är sannolikt vettigt att använda sig av lämpliga Nato-reglementen som vi

    nu har lång erfarenhet ifrån på bägge sidor

  • En analys över juridiska och politiska aspekter måste genomföras
  • Utbilda finska båtförare på svenska stridsbåtar och vice versa
  • Öva  Öva  Öva!

Är det möjligt? Jag bedömer att frågan är med “Ja” besvarad (om viljan finns)

Finsk ubåtsjaktsförmåga (Corporal Frisk)

Ubåtsjakt har alltid varit en relativt lågt prioriterad förmåga för den finska Marinen. Orsaken är enkel, majoriteten av finska vattenområden är helt enkelt olämpliga för konventionella ubåtar. Finska Viken och Skärgårdshavet består av ett gytter av större och mindre öar och skär, och de farleder som finns är ofta både grunda och svårnavigerade. Medeldjupet i Finska Viken är under 25 meter, och belysande är det faktum att under Andra Världskriget löstes problemet med Sovjetiska ubåtar genom den till synes primitiva åtgärden att två stålnät med kodnamnet Walross spändes tvärs över viken mellan estniska Nargö och finska Porkala Udd. Dessa förhindrade effektivt all fientlig ubåtsverksamhet under seglingssäsongerna 1943 och 1944. Situationen i Bottenhavet är något bättre ur kränkande nations synvinkel, men där saknas mål med samma strategiska värde som de som hittas längs sydkusten, och för att komma dit krävs att man passerar genom Skärgårdshavet.

Åbolands skärgård illustrerar de trånga farvatten som är karakteristiska för stora delar av den finska sydkusten. Källa: Finlex 15.03.2010 TRAFI/7106/03.04.01.00/2010 / Sjöfartsverkets sjökort
Åbolands skärgård illustrerar de trånga farvatten som är karakteristiska för stora delar av den finska sydkusten. Källa: Finlex 15.03.2010 TRAFI/7106/03.04.01.00/2010 / Sjöfartsverkets sjökort

Med det sagt är undervattensoperationer inne på finskt vatten, särskilt i de fall moderna miniubåtar används, ingen omöjlighet, varför också Marinens ubåtsjaktförmåga fått ökad prioritet. Grunden i den finska ubåtsjaktförmågan är ett nätverk av fasta sensorer. Deras antal, prestanda, och exakta placeringar hör till Marinens bäst bevarade hemligheter (i varje fall för de länder som inte genomfört undervattenskränkningar och kartlagt dessa), men i en intervju under hösten beskrev kommodor Markus Aarnio i egenskap av chef för Finska Vikens Marinkommando övervakningskapaciteten som mycket god: ”De finns ett begränsat antal ställen i vår skärgård där en ubåt kan ta sig fram, vi vet var dessa ställen är. Där har vi övervakning i gång 24 timmar i dygnet sju dagar i veckan, både över och under ytan.”

Specifikt handlar det om lyssnarkedjor eller –stationer under ytan, medan farkoster i ytläge dessutom får räkna med radar och elektrooptiska sensorer. I de fall någon av stationerna noterar något utöver det vanliga sänds, för att citera kommodor Aarnios, ”någon enhet” till platsen för att undersöka saken.

Vilka är då dessa enheter? I Marinen hittas framförallt fyra klasser som har den kvalificerade sonarutrustning som krävs för att lokalisera ubåtar.

MHC Katanpää under gång. Källa: Wikimedia Commons/MKFI

Katanpää-klassen består av tre minjaktfartyg. Dessa håller som bäst på att tas i bruk, och utgör de kanske mest kvalificerade enheterna i hela Östersjön när det gäller att hitta föremål under vattnet. De aktive sensorerna håller en mycket klass, och inbegriper både skrovmonterade- och släpsonarer. Bland dessa märks flerstrålelodet Atlas HMS-12M, som även hittas på svenska Kosterklass minjaktsfartyg. Katanpää-klassens största nackdel är avsaknandet av passiv sonar och alla former av beväpning förutom en Bofors allmålspjäs och tunga kulsprutor. Fartygen är i dagsläget inte slutligt förklarade operativa, en process som planeras för senare i år.

Hamina-klassens robotbåt Tornio (81). Källa: Wikimedia Commons/MKFI
Rauma-klassens robotbåt Porvoo (72) utan sina sjömålsrobotar. Källa: Wikimedia Commons

Den finska Marinens skarpa spets består av två klasser om vardera fyra robotbåtar, Rauma-klassen levererad 1990-92 och den nyare Hamina-klassen levererad 1998-2006. Rauma-klassen genomgick en halvtidsmodifiering som blev klar 2013, vilken avsevärt har höjt dess ubåtsjaktförmåga. Rauma-klassen har möjlighet att utrustas med Kongsbergs ST2400 VDS släpsonar (även känd som Simrad Subsea Toadfish). Det är en avancerad sonar som kan arbeta både passivt och aktivt, och är specialutvecklad för användning i grunda vatten och inomskärs. Nackdelen är att monteringen förhindrar användandet av de aktre sjömålsrobotarna på Rauma-klassen, vilket reducerar robotbeväpningen med hälften. Som alternativ till släpsonarn kan också Finnyards SONAC-PTA passiv släpsonar monteras, med samma begräsningar som för ST2400 VDS. SONAC-PTA består av 24 hydrofoner monterade på en 78 meter lång sensor, som kan släpas upp till 600 meter efter båten. Åtminstone två SONAC-PTA har anskaffats till Marinen, främst för användning ombord på Rauma-klassen.

Edit 17.1.2015 13:40 (GMT+2):

Hamina-klassen projekterades med ubåtsjaktförmåga motsvarande Raumas, men på grund av ekonomiska orsaker ströks alla ubåtsjaktvapen förutom sjunkbomber.

Hämeenmaa-klassens minfartyg Uusimaa (05). Källa: Wikimedia Commons/MKFI

De två Hämeenmaa-klassens minskepp utgör numera Marinens tyngsta enheter, och är också utrustade med Simrad SS 304 (Sonar 191 i svenska Marinen), vilket ger dem en begränsad ubåtsjaktförmåga. Enligt vissa källor är de förberedda för montering av ST2400 VDS, men det taktiska värdet i att jaga ubåtar med dessa relativt stora enheter får anses begränsat.

Ytterligare en mer eller mindre unik aspekt för den finska Marinen är att ifall en ubåt skall bekämpas, så görs det i första hand med hjälp av antiubåtsgranat- och raketkastare. Orsaken till detta är delvis historisk, då Parisfreden 1948 förbjöd användandet av torpeder. Finland har unilateralt sagt upp begränsningarna 1990 efter att först ha informerat Sovjet och Storbritannien, som inte kom med några anmärkningar, men än så länge har torpeder inte anskaffats. Ubåtsjakttorpeder var aktuella för Rauma-klassen i samband med halvtidsmodifieringen, men ströks på grund av budgetskäl. Däremot ryktas det att den projekterade MTA2020-klassen kommer att utrustas med torpeder.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Rauma-klassens huvudbeväpning är Saabs Elma LLS.920, med nio avfyrningsklara granater per pjäs. Två LLS.920 kan monteras. Hämeenmaa förlitar sig i sin tur på den Sovjetiska/Ryska RBU-1200 raketkastaren, och har möjlighet att föra två kastare per fartyg, med fem raketer per kastare färdiga för avfyrning. Båda klasserna kan också föra ett begränsat antal sjunkbomber. Katanpää-klassen saknar som nämnts helt möjlighet att bekämpa mål under vattenytan.

Gränsbevaningens nyaste fartyg, Turva, under provkörning. Källa: Gränsbevakningen

Edit 17.1.2015 13:40 (GMT+2):

Förutom Marinen har Gränsbevakningen ett antal fartyg som kan delta i ubåtsjaktsoperationer. Dessa inkluderar nybygget Turva, vilken som bäst håller på att tas i bruk, samt de äldre Merikarhu, Tursas och Uisko. Dessa har varierande sensorutrustning, och kan föra sjunkbomber i krigstid. En operativ fördel de har är att de i motsats till Marinens fartyg fritt kan uppträda i Åländska farvatten.

Som synes är de finska enheterna som kan jaga ubåtar en brokig skara både vad gäller förmåga, ålder och beväpning. Vissa nyckelsystem saknas helt, inklusive helikoptrar med ubåtsjaktförmåga och ubåtsjakttorpeder. Ett stort förmågelyft är att vänta när MTA2020 kommer att ersätta Hämeenmaa- och Rauma-klassen i mitten av nästa decennium, även om antalet skrov förväntas minska. Trots det får de nuvarande enheterna anses ge en ”tillräcklig” ubåtsjaktförmåga för att skydda finska vatten mot dagens relativt lilla hotbild.

Det stora problemet är istället bristen på realistiska övningar.

Finland saknar som bekant helt ubåtar, både konventionella- och miniubåtar. Detta gör realistiska ubåtsjaktövningar mycket sällsynta, vilket naturligtvis har en avgörande effekt på fartygsbesättningarnas förmåga att effektivt använda till buds stående medel för att lokalisera och bekämpa fientlig undervattensverksamhet. Ur den synvinkeln är möjligheten att öva tillsammans med de erkänt duktiga svenska ubåtsjägarna mot några av de modernaste konventionella ubåtar som finns en mycket värdefull erfarenhet.

Outstanding Ships of the Finnish Navy

FNS Uusimaa (05). Source: Puolustusvoimat.

As the Russian News Agency ITAR-TASS recently published a picture gallery of 13 “Outstanding ships of the Russian Navy”, a  twitter discussion took place about if the Finnish Navy could be presented in the same way. While waiting for the official feature, here comes a little pick focusing on classes instead of individual ships.

Hämeenmaa-class

FNS Hämeenmaa (02). Source: Puolustusvoimat

The Hämenmaa-class consists of two vessel, which at a displacement of 1 300 t currently holds the distinction of being the largest ships in the navy. Both have been extensively upgraded roughly a decade ago, and features modern facilities, meaning they are as adapt at hunting pirates in the Indian Ocean as they are laying mines in the Gulf of Finland. Katanpää-class

FNS Katanpää (40). Source: Wikimedia Commons/MKFI.

The newest major ship class of the navy is in fact so new it is expected to reach operational readiness only next year. These multipurpose mine countermeasure vessels are equipped with modern equipment to be able to safely hunt down mines, or search the seabed for wrecks and similar. They are also the first Finnish naval vessels equipped with Voith Schneider propellers.

Pansio-class

FNS Pyhäranta (875). Source: Wikimedia Commons/MKFI

The Pansio-class mine ferries may look ungainly with their big boxy hulls, but in reality they fulfill an important role in the navy, being able to handle not only large quantities of mines, but also of transporting general cargo in a roll-on/roll-off configuration.

Hamina-class

FNS Hanko (82). Source Wikimedia Commons/MKFI.

The Hamina-class fast attack crafts are for the navy what the F-18 Hornets are for the air force: they are fast, sleek, deadly… and expensive. The class represents the cutting edge of modern light surface combatants, equipped with some of the best sensors and armaments available.

U700-class

The U700 prototype. Source: Marine Alutech Oy Ab.

So new it is still waiting for its “proper” name, The U700-class, named “Jehu”, is the future workhorse for the Finnish marines, and a major boost compared to the current Jurmo-class. The new boats offer a higher top speed, ballistic protection, NBC-protection, and a remote weapon station. The marines will now be riding into battle in an APC, instead of in a truck like they used to.

G-boat

G-boat (G-102). Source: Puolustusvoimat.

While the U700 may be the one with all the bells and whistles, few boats in the navy can match the thrill of the light G-boat speeding over the waves. The boat is used to transport small teams of soldiers to shore, with speed and maneuverability as its only defence. Thankfully, it has a lot of both, due to its single water jet and 170 kW/ (230 hp) engine.

Isku

FNS Isku (826). Source: Penalandia.net/Pentti Heikkilä

The research and test vessel Isku is one of the less well-known vessels of the fleet. Operated by the Naval Research Institute, it is usually far from the headlines, but right at the forefront of current research.

Kampela 3

Kampela_3_Kuusinen
Kampela 3 (877). Source: Wikimedia Commons/MKFI

With all the grace of a car ferry, the Kampela is the logistics officer’s best friend, at least when an exercise requires large cargo to be shipped to one of the old island forts in the Gulf of Finland. The large deck can also be adapted with equipment to either lay or hunt for mines.

Louhi

FNS Louhi (999). Source: Wikimedia Commons/Tupsumato.

The multipurpose vessel Louhi is unique in that it is owned by the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), but manned and operated by the navy. The main purpose of the vessel is to function as a response vessel in the case of oil spill accidents and other environmental disasters, but the daily trade of the vessel is centered around the laying of sea cables, functioning as a dive support ship, and performing underwater maintenance.

MTA2020 and its Swedish connection – Pt 2. Finland

The following is part two of three, discussing the possibilities of Finnish-Swedish cooperation in the field of new support ships. Part one (published yesterday) dealt mainly with the Swedish plans, with this part focusing on the Finnish MTA2020, and in part three (published tomorrow) I will try to wrap it up. As mentioned, I have no inside information on the MTA2020 or L10, but everything is based on open sources.

Finland – MTA2020

The MTA2020 is very vaguely described in the article. As opposed to the Hämenmaa-class, which currently can operate in the Mediterranean but not further afield, the MTA2020 is supposed to be able to operate in the Indian Ocean on international duties, as well as to perform its wartime missions in the Finnish archipelagoes and home waters.

The MTA2020 will most probably be a large ship by Finnish standards. Also, seeing the emphasize placed by the Finnish navy on mines in naval warfare (e.g. the mine rails were kept on the refurbished Hämeenmaa ships, as opposed to the Swedish solution for HMS Carlskrona), the MTA2020 might well feature a combined Ro/Ro and mine deck. For prolonged operations abroad, full flight facilities including a hangar might be wished for, but it is unclear which helicopter would be used, as the Finnish Navy currently does not operate any helicopters of their own.

If the ship would indeed receive full flight facilities, my personal belief is that the use of NH-90, even in its NFH-version, is unlikely, as it is a rather heavy helicopter. An order for a limited number of light marine helicopters, e.g. the AW159 Wildcat or AS565 Panther, would seem logical, and would dramatically boost both the ASW and ASuW capabilities of the navy, by providing stand-off ASW capability and over-the-horizon targeting capability for ship based AShM. However, the cost of such a procurement might well prove to be prohibitive.

Exactly in which way the MTA2020 is supposed to replace the Rauma-class is more uncertain, as weapons will probably be limited to a self-defence SAM-system, one medium caliber dual-purpose gun similar in performance to the Bofors 57 mm currently fitted to the Hämeenmaa, and some kind of anti-submarine weapons (might we see torpedoes aboard a Finnish ship for the first time since WWII?).

The role it could take over from the Rauma is escorting merchant shipping, where it could tackle air and potentially sub-surface threats. Operating a MTO2020 in this way together with a Hamina-class PGG or two might prove a winning combo, being able to take on air, surface and sub-surface threats, with the MTO2020 replenishing the Haminas at sea to provide longer endurance.

However, having heavier equipment on support ships are not unheard of. The Rhein-class depot ships of the Bundesmarine were fitted with two 100 mm DP guns in single turrets, a number of 40 mm AA guns, and up to 70 mines, meaning they could fulfill wartime roles as a mineship or light frigate (this was before guided missiles became the weapons of choice for almost every mission). The heavy armament also meant that they could serve as training ships, benefitting from a larger complement, meaning that more people could be trained per cruise compared to a “real” frigate or missile/torpedo craft.

This later might be an idea that would interest the Finnish navy. Mounting a four-cell AShM launcher on the MTA2020 would provide the navy with a more or less ideal training vessel, having the same(?) weapons and sensors as the Hamina-class (or, whatever the Hamina-class will receive when the time comes for their MLU), as well as mine rails, almost every position on most warships of the navy could be taught onboard the MTA2020.

While the Finnish navy is no stranger to this kind of arrangement, having operated the Bay-class frigate HMS Porlock Bay (‘K650’/’F650’) for over ten years in the training role as Matti Kurki before scrapping her in 1975, as stated above, I find it unlikely that the MTA2020 will get its own AShM-launcher.